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Arnos Grove Medical Centre
269 Bowes Road, New Southgate, London, N11 1BD

‘Help us to help you towards better health’ (Updated August 2019)
Tel: 0208 368 4455
E-Mail: enfccg.arnosgrove-reception@nhs.net

If you live alone and have either a high temperature or a new continuous cough, do not leave your home for 7 days. If you live with other people, keep them at home for 14 days. To check if you need medical help, use the 111 coronavirus service. Only

Childhood Vaccinations


One of the most important things that a parent can do for their child is to make sure that they have all their routine childhood vaccinations. It's the most effective way of keeping them protected against infectious diseases.

 

Ideally, kids should have their jabs at the right age to protect them as early as possible and minimise the risk of infection.


Vaccination Checklist

 

Here's a checklist of the vaccines that are routinely offered to everyone in the UK for free on the NHS, and the age at which you should ideally have them.

Please remember to bring in your child's red book at the time of ay immunisations. If you do not have a red book and the baby was born abroad, please bring in all immunisation records you hold for your child so we can check to see what your child is due.

 

Childhood Vaccination Schedule

At two months old  (8 weeks old):

  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) - one injection
  • Pneumococcal infection - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) - one injection
  • Meningococcal group B (Men B)- one injection
  • Rotavirus gastroenteritis- oral drops

 

  At three months old (12 weeks old):

  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) - one injection

  • Rotavirus- oral drops

 

At four months old (16 weeks old):

  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) - one injection

  • Men B - one injection

  • Pneumococcal infection - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) - one injection

 

At 12 months old (On or after the child's 1st birthday):

  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and meningitis C (Hib/MenC) - booster dose in one injection

  • Pneumococcal

  • Meales, mumps and rubella (German measles) (MMR)- one injection

  • Men B-one injection

 

At 2 to 8 years old (including children in school years 1-4):

  • Influenza (each year from September)- Live vaccine- both nostrils

 

At 3 years four months or soon after (pre-school):

 

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough) and polio (dTaP/IPV or DTaP/IPV) - one injection

  • Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles) (MMR) - one injection

 

12 to 13 years old:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus and polio (Td/IPV) - one injection

 

14 years old (school year 9)

  • Meningococcal groups A, C, W and Y disease- Men ACWY- one injection

 

Vaccines For Risk Groups

 

People who fall into certain risk groups may be offered extra vaccines. These include vaccinations against diseases such as hepatitis B, tuberculosis (TB), seasonal flu and chickenpox. See the NHS Choices pages on vaccines for adults to find out whether you should have one.

 

Read more about vaccines for kids on the NHS Choices website.

 

 

 

BOWEL CANCER SCREENING

Bowel cancer screening involves having tests to check if you have or are at risk of bowel cancer.

Why it's offered

Bowel cancer is a common type of cancer in both men and women. About 1 in 20 people will get it during their lifetime.

Screening can help detect bowel cancer at an early stage, when it's easier to treat. It can also be used to help check for and remove small growths in the bowel called polyps, which can turn into cancer over time.

Types of screening test

There are 2 types of test used in NHS bowel cancer screening:

  • bowel scope screening – a test where a thin, flexible tube with a camera at the end is used to look for and remove any polyps inside your bowel
  • home testing kit (the FIT or FOB test) – a kit you use to collect small samples of your poo and post them to a laboratory so they can be checked for tiny amounts of blood (which could be caused by cancer)

If these tests find anything unusual, you might be asked to have further tests to confirm or rule out cancer.

When it's offered

NHS bowel cancer screening is only offered to people aged 55 or over, as this is when you're more likely to get bowel cancer:

  • if you're 55, you'll automatically be invited for a one-off bowel scope screening test, if it's available in your area
  • if you're 60 to 74, you'll automatically be invited to do a home testing kit every 2 years
  • if you're 75 or over, you can ask for a home testing kit every 2 years by calling the free bowel cancer screening helpline on 0800 707 60 60

If you're too young for screening but are worried about a family history of bowel cancer, speak to a GP for advice.

Always see a GP if you have symptoms of bowel cancer at any age – do not wait to have a screening test.

Risks of screening

No screening test is 100% reliable. There's a chance a cancer could be missed, meaning you might be falsely reassured.

There's also a small risk that the bowel scope screening test and some of the tests you might have if screening finds something unusual could damage your bowel, but this is rare.

There are no risks to your health from the home testing kit.



Content provided by NHS Choices.

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